And the Shofar Blew by Francine Rivers

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And the Shofar Blew is a thought-provoking novel by Francine Rivers that is built around the framework of the Christian church. The novel examines just how easy it is for a pastor to lead his members astray in the pursuit of growth. It also takes a convicting look at how the actions of the church members can affect an entire community in a negative way. Jesus said that His followers should be the light of the world; they should be doing everything they can to influence the world for the better, not join the crowd. This book takes a look at what happens when Christians follow only the good feelings and never get to the heart of the matter. In spite of it’s many good qualities and Biblically-based content, I found the first one-third of the book to be less than engaging. However, I was impressed by the way Rivers’ built on the simple beginning and formed flawed characters at every turn. The novel deals with subjects such as the church body, pastors, generational sin, family patterns, every person’s inner need for parental approval, spiritual blindness, selfishness, pain, grief, struggle, death, life, and the healing power of God’s never-ending love for us. The opening chapters of And the Shofar Blew introduce the reader to one of the three main characters, an older man named Samuel Mason. Samuel is weary of spirit, yet his mind is full of ideas. He and two other men are watching a church that they helped to build and nurture slip from their hands. Their original pastor has become consumed with his health problems, and can no longer shepherd their small flock at Centerville Christian Church. Unfortunately, the congregation numbers have been on the decline for some time, and Samuel feels that if they do not act fast, the church will close it’s doors and never reopen. After discussing his plans with the other elders, Samuel begins to look for a new pastor. He finds an excellent prospect in a young man named Paul Hudson. Paul is everything that any small church would want in a new pastor, he has it all, a popular TV preacher for a father, a flawless resume, and the perfect little family. There’s just one problem, and it is one that will not be apparent until much after he is hired; Paul feels that he will never be enough for his father. While this feeling is justified to some extent, Paul must learn to find his worth in Christ alone, which is easier said than done. Samuel hires Paul as the church’s new pastor, and at first, everything goes well. The congregation grows and becomes more diverse, Paul’s sermons are Biblically sound and convicting, and his sweet, musically-talented wife Eunice and adorable son Timmy do much to brighten up the drab walls of Centerville Christian. However, it is not long before Paul allows his work to take first place in his life. He forgets all about Eunice and Timmy, and begins to do whatever he feels is best for the church….even if that means driving away those who could have helped him to see the light. Samuel Mason tries to offer words of wisdom, but is brushed off by Paul at every turn. Meanwhile, Eunice bears the burden of Paul’s insults and careless behavior. Yet, she is not perfect either, and almost allows temptation to lead to sin in her weakness. However, unlike her husband, she runs into the arms of her Savior before it is too late. Will Paul recognize his faults before it is too late? Will he ask God for forgiveness and begin to repair broken relationships before he loses all that he holds dear? To answer these questions, read the book! I think that this novel could make an excellent drama film that portrays the inner workings of the church, including the skeletons in the closet. I would like to see someone make a movie that is at least similar to this plot, but, like always, we await the glorious day when filmmakers will use the content they already have to truly make a difference.

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